BFR Radio
Wrestling training with BFR – how to improve physical & technical capacity of wrestlers

Wrestling training with BFR – how to improve physical & technical capacity of wrestlers

June 17, 2021

Hi everyone. And welcome back to this episode of BFR radio. Hope your own training is going well. Thank you for all of your questions about blood flow restriction. And if you do have any burning questions of your own, please DM me through my social channels, which is @chrisgaviglio or my website contact us page, which is www.sportsrehab.com.au.

A reminder that I have an introduction to BFR presentation on the play education platform. That's P L AE. This is a fantastic initiative by PLAE. And the goal is actually to extend my one hour to my full BFR workshop on this online platform. So stay tuned for that. And I'll definitely let you know. There's also a lot of other fantastic presentations and courses on this platform so make sure you check it out. Click here: https://plaeacademy.com

 

Today's episode is going to be the last episode in relation to this upper body short mini series in BFR. And recently I've been focusing on how BFR can be used effectively in different upper body scenarios. 

In particular, we looked at the muscular benefits with low load BFR bench, press and practical bicep curls. The third episode highlighted the benefits of using BFR for wrist fractures and the fourth, and the penultimate episode showed that we can improve grip, strength and size using something very simple as hand squeezing type exercises.

Hence, I thought it was a really great segue to today's episode, which is more of a practical sporting example, and really the title says it all:

Effect of exercise program with blood flow restriction on upper limb vasculature and performance in wrestlers.

Ghoraba, M., Ghazy, M., & El Tomey, M. (2017).

IJSSA, 2, 298-327.

 

In the study I mentioned a technique called a Gut Wrench. Here is the link to a good video explaining it if you're interested:

Click here to see Gut Wrench technique video

I really like this study with respect to the practical applications of BFR to a sport. There's actually a few other sports specific studies starting to appear in literature, which really highlights the positive application of BFR.

In closing, if there's a topic of interest you'd like me to cover in this short mini series please let me know, as I'm really interested in knowing what interests you. Thanks again for listening.

Hope you've enjoyed it.

If you do know of someone who would benefit from this episode, please share it.

And if you haven't got a set of your own BFR cuffs, please visit my website, which is www.sportsrehab.com.au, where you can purchase the Sports Rehab Tourniquet.

I can also help you with your training. So please contact me via my website. or, DM me through my socials, which is @chrisgaviglio.

Lastly, if you're enjoying the podcast, please give it a rating on iTunes. Thanks for listening and remember to keep the pump.

BFR Handgrip training - improve your grip strength & forearm size.

BFR Handgrip training - improve your grip strength & forearm size.

May 31, 2021

Welcome back to this episode of BFR Radio, hope you're doing well. Remember if you have any questions about BFR, please DM me through my social channels, which is @chrisgaviglio on Instagram or Twitter, or alternatively through my website, contact us, or actually it's just me page, which is sportsrehab.com.au. I've been actually receiving a few messages, so thanks for reaching out and I'll definitely be incorporating them into the podcast over the coming episodes. If you're looking for some good BFR learning opportunities, I've teamed up with PLAE who are known for  really top quality sports flooring.  They have an education arm as well and I've produced an introduction to BFR presentation.  This is an hour long presentation, which has some learning opportunities or learning questions along the way. So you can actually test your understanding of BFR and actual goal is to put my full BFR workshop on this online learning platform. So stay tuned for that.

Click here for the PLAE website and access my course: https://plaeacademy.com

 

There are lots of other great courses that are available to you from some of the top S&C coaches, all around the world so make sure you check them out.

And also talking about just general BFR information, I also appear on another podcast with a fellow health specialist. Her name is Zora, and she actually goes by the Instagram handle @hackmyage. And overall she interviews lots of fantastic guests looking at ways to, I guess, Biohack their own health.  This can range from anything, from exercise to nutrition, to breathing, cold water immersion, and so forth.

Click here to check out her website & other great information: Click to find out more about Zora

Click here to link to my podcast with Zora on BFR: Podcast with Zora

So moving on to today's article we're going to look at hand grip strength. And in particular, it's called:

Effects of handgrip training with venous restriction on brachial artery vasodilation

Credeur, D. P., Hollis, B. C., & Welsch, M. A. (2010).

Medicine and science in sports and exercise, 42(7), 1296.

And this serves as a really good segue for my next episode, where it'll actually be the last in the mini series on BFR upper body. And it's actually going to look at how you can use BFR in upper body training to help athletes where improved grip or grappling ability is really important.

And if you do know of someone who would benefit from this episode, please share it. I really do appreciate all your interactions.  And if you haven't got your own set of BFR cuffs, please visit my website, which is sportsrehab.com.au.

And I can also help you with your own training so once again, contact me through my website or my socials.  

If you enjoy the podcast, I'd appreciate if you give it a rating, on iTunes.

Thanks for listening, see at the next episode. And remember to keep the pump.

Using BFR to rehab from a foot (navicular) fracture - Your Questions Answered.

Using BFR to rehab from a foot (navicular) fracture - Your Questions Answered.

May 4, 2021

Thanks again for joining me on this month's episode and the last three episodes we've delved into the upper body BFR mini series. In particular, we looked at article reviews with respect to muscular benefits of BFR Bench Press, and bicep curls.

And the last episode we looked at how it could be used to improve recovery from a hand fracture or more so improving pain and function with the addition of BFR to a normal rehab program for a hand fracture. 

And for today's episode, like they say, variety's the spice of life. So we're going to take a small break from the mini-series and we're actually going to go into your questions answered. And although this wasn't a specific, your questions answered, I do get a lot of questions from people out there, like yourself who have actually got their own question.

And afterwards I sat down and I wrote some notes and I thought I'd actually formulate it into this episode you've got here. The question I have today is from an athletics Sprint's coach, and he has an athlete who has a foot fracture of the navicular bone. Now this  can be quite a serious injury if not looked after properly.

His question was around how we could use BFR within his rehab and return to run program. With respect to this injury, I'm going to be talking about the affected limb and that's going to be the foot that has the fracture.

 

This is a really practical episode with lots of different uses for BFR in this scenario. I hope you enjoy it.  

 

If you know of someone who has a similar kind of injury and you would benefit from listening to this episode, please share it.

If you are actually going through the same injury and you want some guidance on how you could be using in your own training, I could actually help you with that as well. So please contact me via my website or DM me through my socials on Twitter or Instagram, which is @chrisgaviglio.

Also there's loads of information on my website, which is www.sportsrehab.com.au. And I also have a YouTube channel, which has SportsRehabAus. Thanks for listening. I'll see you next week, when we're going to get back into the upper body mini series. Good luck with your training and remember to keep the pump.

 

Chris

Using BFR for hand fracture rehab - a rehab tool to enhance your therapy.

Using BFR for hand fracture rehab - a rehab tool to enhance your therapy.

April 20, 2021

Welcome back to this episode of BFR radio,hope you're doing well and enjoying this upper body series.

Just a friendly reminder about my sports rehab tourniquet BFR cuffs is that I've got new valves. I've actually had them for a few months now and everyone's loving them and looked the concept's pretty simple.

There's two valves which connect together and they help inflate the cuff.  It's a little bit nicer. The connections are a lot firmer. Everyone that is using the new valves on the cuffs are loving it. So if you have the older style connection, which was a simple tube into an twist valve, you can actually upgrade your cuffs. All you have to do is head to my website, which is sports rehab.com. I've got a little video with it as well at which it's really simple and quick to change them over and I guarantee you'll love the new upgrade.

 

Onto this episode, this is the third article review in the upper body series. Today we move away from the muscular benefits of BFR and look at the benefits with respect to bone fractures. Episode seven of BFR Radio actually reviewed an article that looked at the role of BFR and the rationale for improving bone reformation. In animal studies the use of BFR has been shown to improve fracture, healing time and there's actually a few human case studies as well. So see, episode 10, if you're a little bit more interested in this concept. Getting straight into the article, it's called:

Blood flow restriction therapy after closed treatment of distal radius fractures.

Cancio, J. M., Sgromolo, N. M., & Rhee, P. C. (2019).  Journal of wrist surgery, 8(4), 288.s," 

 

If you know of someone who would benefit from this episode, please share it.  Alternatively, if you're going through this same rehab and interesting in purchasing your own set of BFR cuffs, please visit my website, which is www.sportsrehab.com.au

And also once again, do you enjoy the 60 seconds snippets? If so, make sure you let me know, give it a comment, give it a thumbs up. Thanks for listening. And remember to keep the pump.

How to use BFR to maximise Bicep Hypertrophy.

How to use BFR to maximise Bicep Hypertrophy.

April 6, 2021

Welcome back to welcome back to this episode of BFR radio. Before I head into today's article review a quick reminder that if you're looking for practical ideas on how to implement BFR into your own training, check out my Instagram, which is @chrisgaviglio or my YouTube channel, which is SportsRehabAus.

 

If you follow me on Instagram or Twitter, you would have seen that I've been adding in 60 seconds snippets, which are short 60 seconds snippets of the previous podcasts that I've done. I would actually love to hear if you're enjoying these best bits of the podcast. It's always good to know that my work's being well-received. If you have any questions, please ask and I'll get to them as soon as I can.

 

Onto today's episode, which is the second article review in the upper body series and what wouldn't be an upper body BFR article review without looking at some bicep curls.

On a more serious note there's some really great uses for BFR aside from just the bicep curls. But this article again, looks at the difference between high load non BFR and low load BFR periodization models. And why I keep talking about this is because I really think that understanding how the difference between a low load and a high load periodisation model with or without BFR on certain exercises can result in similar outcomes, I think has really positive outcomes for you as a practitioner.

 

Today's article is called:

Practical blood flow restriction training increases muscle hypertrophy during a periodized resistance training programme.

 Lowery, R. P., Joy, J. M., Loenneke, J. P., de Souza, E. O., Machado, M., Dudeck, J. E., & Wilson, J. M. (2014). 

Clinical physiology and functional imaging, 34(4), 317-321.

 

This is a really simple article, but I think it's quite nice to show that something as simple as this can be quite effective and the next article review we'll move away from the muscular benefits and we'll look at how BFR could be used to improve recovery of hand fractures. And I have spoken about  the role that BFR plays in improved formation which I think is a fascinating concept with respect to how we're training our clients or our athletes who may have fractures.

 If you want any more information about BFR or you want to order a set of your own BFR costs, please head to my website, which is https://www.sportsrehab.com.au

And if you want to contact me, you can do so via the contact us, or the contact me on my website or just DM me through my socials on Instagram or Twitter, which is @chrisgaviglio. Finally, if you enjoy the podcast, please give it a rating in iTunes and also share it with someone who may benefit from this information.

 

Thanks for listening and remember to keep the pump.

Supercharge your Bench Press training - combining BFR low load & high load training (article review)

Supercharge your Bench Press training - combining BFR low load & high load training (article review)

March 9, 2021

Hi everyone and welcome back to this episode of BFR radio.

Not sure if you've noticed, but I've been trying a few different things of late. Firstly, I'm trying to increase the frequency of podcasts released to fortnightly, which was from once a month. And there's also a new segment, which is called your questions answered. A lot of people are asking some great questions. So my mantra around this is that if you have a question, I'm sure that there's lots of other people out there as well with that same question or something similar. Therefore, if you have a question and you're happy to come online, please contact me and we can have a chat.

 

 You'll also notice that recently in the last couple of weeks, that on my socials, which is @chrisgaviglio, I've been releasing 60 seconds snippets of the previous podcast. These are the best bits of the podcast and hopefully a great reminder of what was covered. If you love it, let me know and I'll continue doing that for you.

With the article reviews I've also tried to group them together to give the use of BFR better context. The first article series that I did recently was around the use of BFR in surgery and in particular, looking at knee surgery, if you missed them, check them out.

 And this brings me onto the next series of BFR articles, and this will focus on the upper body. In one of my earlier BFR radio podcast episodes I reviewed an article on high-frequency Bench Press. Today's article, which kicks off this series, again, looks at the bench press, but rather this looks at combining protocols of both high load and low load BFR Bench Press training within the same week. This article is called:

 

Combined effects of low-intensity blood flow restriction training and high-intensity resistance training on muscle strength and size. 

Yasuda, T., Ogasawara, R., Sakamaki, M., Ozaki, H., Sato, Y., & Abe, T. (2011).

European journal of applied physiology111(10), 2525-2533.

 

I truly think that this series will once again, like the knee surgery series highlight some great ways of using BFR aside from just using it for bicep curls and bench press. If you want to know more information about BFR or you want to order your own set of BFR cuffs please head to my website, which is www.sportsrehab.com.au.

If you want to contact me, you can do this via the contact us, or should be contact me on the website, or just DM me through my socials on Instagram or Twitter, which is @chrisgaviglio.

Twitter - click here

Instagram - click here

If you enjoy the podcast, please give it a writing an iTunes, and also share it with someone who may benefit from this information. Thanks for listening. See you next time and remember to keep the pump. 

Managing Achilles pain with BFR in sprinters - Your questions answered.

Managing Achilles pain with BFR in sprinters - Your questions answered.

February 23, 2021

Welcome to today's episodes. I have just finished the short collective mini-series on the multiple uses of BFR around knee surgery. In this collective series of article reviews, I wanted to highlight the multiple uses of BFR within one scenario.

 

With today's episode, I talk to sprinter Mark Giglio where we discuss how to use blood flow restriction to help manage his achilles pain. In particular we look at how he can use BFR for general pain/stiffness, sprint and strength training sessions. Mark has lots of great questions and we discuss how BFR could also be used to maximise  training and competition outcomes. In particular we discuss about the potential increases in endogenous (naturally occurring in the body) anabolic hormones. With respect to most athletes, the ability to increase anabolic hormones concentrations in the body (esp. testosterone) has positive benefits to improvements in strength, speed, power and behaviours associated with positive outcome.

 

I really enjoyed this conversation, and the goal of this segment is to help educate users of BFR. My motto with this segment is that the questions that you have may also help someone else. So if you have a burning question on how to use BFR (any pure happy to come onto the podcast) get in contact with me.

If you like this podcast please give it a rating on iTunes or if you know someone who'd benefit from this podcast please share it with them.

 

And if you haven't got a pair of your own BFR cuffs, please head to my website and get yours today - www.sportsrehab.com.au

 

Thanks for listening and remember to keep the pump.

Chris

BFR, surgery & your heart - the cardioprotective ability of Blood Flow Restriction

BFR, surgery & your heart - the cardioprotective ability of Blood Flow Restriction

February 9, 2021

Hi everyone and welcome to today's episode.

 

I've enjoyed putting together this short mini-series on the collective ability of using BFR in multiple different scenarios to assist with improving the operative outcome - in this case knee surgery.

 

Today's episode is around the cardioprotective ability of using Blood Flow Restriction prior to surgery. In particular, perioperative myocardial infarction is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality after major non-cardiac surgery.  Therefore the ability to reduce myocardial injury and other ischaemic complications of surgery holds great benefit. 

Using BFR in this instance, is a great option as traditional methods to reduce the risk are usually pharmacologically based which although the may reduce the risks they do have side-effects in some patients.

The article is pretty heavy with mechanisms so if you are interested please download the article. 

Cardioprotection by remote ischaemic preconditioning.

British journal of anaesthesia, 99(5), 611-616. Walsh, S. R., Tang, T., Sadat, U., Dutka, D. P., & Gaunt, M. E. (2007). 

 

If you haven't yet got a set of BFR cuffs please head to my website to buy your own and if you have any questions please ask as I really want to ensure you get the best use of Blood Flow Restriction for you. Head to https://www.sportsrehab.com.au

 

If there is anyone listening that may benefit from this, please share it.

Thanks for listen

 

Chris

Improve surgical outcome with only 8 days of pre-operative BFR strengthening after knee surgery..

Improve surgical outcome with only 8 days of pre-operative BFR strengthening after knee surgery..

January 28, 2021

Welcome back to this episode which is a short series of paper reviews that highlights the different uses for Blood Flow Restriction around Knee surgery.

 

Today's episode looks at the positive effect of only 8 days of pre-operative strengthening with respect to density and function of the quadriceps within the first 4 weeks of ACL reconstruction. This is a great concept as it is well documented the outcome from surgery is improved with relative muscle strength and size. With the positive effects of training with BFR whilst using low-loads, this training methodology in a pre-operative state really highlight the advantages of blood flow restriction. This is also something to highlight in some people, where the injury may prevent any kind of meaningful strengthening program prior to the operation due to the inability to strength train through a suitable range and load.

 

The article for reference is called:

Preconditioning With Blood Flow Restricted Exercise Preserves Quadriceps Muscle Endurance in Patients After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

Short–Term Frontiers in physiology, 9, 1150.

Žargi, T., Drobnič, M., Stražar, K., & Kacin, A. (2018).

I hope you are enjoying this mini-series that puts together a collection of different BFR papers of relevance to optimising recovery from knee surgery.

If you enjoy this podcast please give it a rating on iTunes.

If you know someone who may benefit from this knowledge please share it with them.

And if you haven't got a set of your own BFR cuffs, please head to my website to purchase of your own today: www.sportsrehab.com.au

See you soon for the next episode.

 

Thanks for listening and remember to keep the pump.

 

Chris

 

Use Blood Flow Restriction to decrease joint and tendon pain - BFR after knee surgery

Use Blood Flow Restriction to decrease joint and tendon pain - BFR after knee surgery

January 13, 2021

Happy New Year.

Late last year I reviewed an article that highlighted the benefits of 12 strength training sessions using BFR post knee arthroscopy around improving muscle size, strength & function. This highlighted the ease and effectiveness of such a simple training addition.

Consequently I wanted to collate a few articles that built on this initial article to highlight the few different uses of BFR around surgery. In this case, we are focusing on the knee.

Today's article review looks at how BFR can decrease joint and tendon pain in the knee joint. I have had a lot of success using BFR for this reason and not just around surgery.

The 2 articles are: 

1. Blood flow restriction-induced analgesia in patients with anterior knee pain. 

Korakakis, V., Whiteley, R., & Epameinontidis, K. (2017).  Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 20, e100.

2. Quadriceps strengthening with and without blood flow restriction in the treatment of patellofemoral pain: a double-blind randomised trial.

Giles, L., Webster, K. E., McClelland, J., & Cook, J. L. (2017). British Journal of Sports Medicine, 51(23), 1688-1694.

 

Join me in the next episode where we will keep building on the multiple ways that you can incorporate BFR around surgery to assist with improving your recovery.

 

If you want to know more about BFR and buy your own set of cuffs please head to my website: www.sportsrehab.com.au

 

Thanks for listening and remember to keep the pump.

 

Chris

 

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